Who we are
Gloria Hill

Gloria Hill

Family Advocate

As a mom of a much loved younger son with schizophrenia and a Factor V clotting disorder, Gloria Hill has combined her training and background as a clinical and supervisory medical professional with advocacy for families and consumers – for more than a decade as the Coordinator for Family Services within Contra Costa County's public mental health system.  She has coached and supported hundreds of family members as well as consumers and is widely credited with developing and sustaining one of the state's most useful support networks for families living with serious mental illness - providing a virtual lifeline to families overwhelmed by the collision of these serious conditions and the healthcare system.  She was awarded “The Threads of Hope Award” by Diablo Magazine for her work in the community as well as a mental health advocacy award from the California Senate, both in 2002.  Gloria understands the lack of connection between physical and behavioral health through her experiences working in both systems.  She knows what mind and attitude shift that must occur in order for this integration to work successfully.

 

Prior to her work in the mental health arena, her training and experience in physical health included managing the Department of Radiology at Children's Hospital, Oakland California and clinical supervision of students from Merritt College who rotated through her department. She worked as a radiology supervisor and instructor at the University of Louisville, as a supervisor for Palo Alto Medical Clinic and Stanford Hospital, and was a nursing instructor in radiology at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona.  While working at Children’s Hospital Oakland, she received “The Outstanding Medical Staff Employee of the Year Award” in 1995 before leaving to get additional training to work in mental health.  Gloria's educational and vocational background in nursing and radiology have been an asset to her understanding of how the brain and the body affect each other's function.  Her expertise in both areas, an unusual combination, has allowed her to address physical as well as behavioral health questions. And because her son suffers from a medical condition  in addition to a serious psychiatric illness, she has learned first-hand how to advocate in both the medical and behavioral health fields.  She has developed a keen understanding of the need to integrate both systems to best serve people who often require care from each.